News Room

How IT support staff can find the cloud’s silver lining

As IT jobs disappear over the horizon and the use of cloud technology continues, you could be forgiven for thinking the future of IT employment is grim, even in the larger cities like Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne. During the last three years, I have seen huge changes in the IT industry, mostly brought about by these two developments.

Offshoring has been going on for many years, affecting the whole sector. Hardest hit though are those in the support area. The ever-increasing popularity of cloud technology means that, in many cases, local support for software applications simply isn’t necessary.

If you have a software problem, what’s the first thing you do? Look online for a solution. Or if you have an IT specialist in your team, perhaps they do it for you. The old way of reaching for the phone and calling your internal helpdesk has all but disappeared.

Options for support staff
So what are the options for current or former IT support staff? I am seeing many people turning to project management. Some are retraining in order to make this move. Others have taken a completely different approach, combining their IT knowledge with external interests to carve out new careers. My colleague, Dave Gallagher, wrote about this in a recent post, when he discussed the trend of IT professionals moving to the audio visual sector.

Many people I talk to describe a whirlwind of change in IT, with conditions eroded and remuneration falling. There is no doubt that our industry is experiencing tough times but, with resilience, optimism and careful planning, it is possible to stay in the game.

The way ahead is to keep on researching the market, upgrading your skills and seeing the opportunities that still exist on your doorstep.

IT is not all bad news
Australia’s Digital Pulse, a report prepared by Deloitte Access Economics for the Australian Computer Society (ACS), predicts that 100,000 new IT and communications jobs will be created in Australia over the next five years. At the same time, students are turning away from relevant courses and a talent shortage is likely to emerge.

For the 600,000 who remain in the industry, jobs will be plentiful, provided they can maintain a relevant skill set. As the adjustments kick in, we can expect a period of short-term pain, lower salaries and lower contract rates, but the long-term outlook is bright.

If you have a support background, the art of remaining employable and riding out the storm is to enhance your existing skills while remaining open to new possibilities.

 

About the Author

Natalie Keam is a senior IT recruitment consultant with many years of experience supporting clients and candidates in the sector. During this time, she has observed many changes in the industry and has seen it rise above the occasional setbacks.

 

 

 

As IT jobs disappear over the horizon and the use of cloud technology continues, you could be forgiven for thinking the future of IT employment is grim, even in the larger cities like Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne. During the last three years, I have seen huge changes in the IT industry, mostly brought about by these two developments.

Offshoring has been going on for many years, affecting the whole sector. Hardest hit though are those in the support area. The ever-increasing popularity of cloud technology means that, in many cases, local support for software applications simply isn’t necessary.

If you have a software problem, what’s the first thing you do? Look online for a solution. Or if you have an IT specialist in your team, perhaps they do it for you. The old way of reaching for the phone and calling your internal helpdesk has all but disappeared.

Options for support staff

So what are the options for current or former IT support staff? I am seeing many people turning to project management. Some are retraining in order to make this move. Others have taken a completely different approach, combining their IT knowledge with external interests to carve out new careers. My colleague, Dave Gallagher, wrote about this in a recent post, when he discussed the trend of IT professionals moving to the audio visual sector.

Many people I talk to describe a whirlwind of change in IT, with conditions eroded and remuneration falling. There is no doubt that our industry is experiencing tough times but, with resilience, optimism and careful planning, it is possible to stay in the game.

The way ahead is to keep on researching the market, upgrading your skills and seeing the opportunities that still exist on your doorstep.

IT is not all bad news

Australia’s Digital Pulse, a report prepared by Deloitte Access Economics for the Australian Computer Society (ACS), predicts that 100,000 new IT and communications jobs will be created in Australia over the next five years. At the same time, students are turning away from relevant courses and a talent shortage is likely to emerge.

For the 600,000 who remain in the industry, jobs will be plentiful, provided they can maintain a relevant skill set. As the adjustments kick in, we can expect a period of short-term pain, lower salaries and lower contract rates, but the long-term outlook is bright.

If you have a support background, the art of remaining employable and riding out the storm is to enhance your existing skills while remaining open to new possibilities.

About the Author

Natalie Keam is a senior IT recruitment consultant with many years of experience supporting clients and candidates in the sector. During this time she has observed many changes in the industry and has seen it rise above the occasional setbacks.

As IT jobs disappear over the horizon and the use of cloud technology continues, you could be forgiven for thinking the future of IT employment is grim, even in the larger cities like Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne. During the last three years, I have seen huge changes in the IT industry, mostly brought about by these two developments.

 

Offshoring has been going on for many years, affecting the whole sector. Hardest hit though are those in the support area. The ever-increasing popularity of cloud technology means that, in many cases, local support for software applications simply isn’t necessary.

 

If you have a software problem, what’s the first thing you do? Look online for a solution. Or if you have an IT specialist in your team, perhaps they do it for you. The old way of reaching for the phone and calling your internal helpdesk has all but disappeared.

 

Options for support staff

So what are the options for current or former IT support staff? I am seeing many people turning to project management. Some are retraining in order to make this move. Others have taken a completely different approach, combining their IT knowledge with external interests to carve out new careers. My colleague, Dave Gallagher, wrote about this in a recent post, when he discussed the trend of IT professionals moving to the audio visual sector.

 

Many people I talk to describe a whirlwind of change in IT, with conditions eroded and remuneration falling. There is no doubt that our industry is experiencing tough times but, with resilience, optimism and careful planning, it is possible to stay in the game.

 

The way ahead is to keep on researching the market, upgrading your skills and seeing the opportunities that still exist on your doorstep.

 

IT is not all bad news

Australia’s Digital Pulse, a report prepared by Deloitte Access Economics for the Australian Computer Society (ACS), predicts that 100,000 new IT and communications jobs will be created in Australia over the next five years. At the same time, students are turning away from relevant courses and a talent shortage is likely to emerge.

 

For the 600,000 who remain in the industry, jobs will be plentiful, provided they can maintain a relevant skill set. As the adjustments kick in, we can expect a period of short-term pain, lower salaries and lower contract rates, but the long-term outlook is bright.

 

If you have a support background, the art of remaining employable and riding out the storm is to enhance your existing skills while remaining open to new possibilities.

 

 

 

 

 

About the Author

Natalie Keam is a senior IT recruitment consultant with many years of experience supporting clients and candidates in the sector. During this time she has observed many changes in the industry and has seen it rise above the occasional setbacks.

 

 

Filter Results:
 
The Latest:

...